Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Ryley Batt puts a Big Hit on New Zealand Opponent

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryley Batt gets airborne as he makes a big hit on the New Zealand ball carrier during the game at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Tim Johnson (#7) from New Zealand looks on and Batt’s teammate, Scott Vitale, looks for the opportunity to steal the ball.

Bryce Alman Moves with the Ball

Australian wheelchair rugby player Bryce Alman sizes up his options as he brings the ball down the court in the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.

Scott Vitale Carries the Ball against New Zealand

Australian wheelchair rugby player Scott Vitale carries the ball, pursued by a New Zealand defender, Tim Johnson (#7), at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. In the background, Vitale’s teammate Nazim Erdem looks on.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2006

Australian Team

Players –¬† Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5), Gary Read (0.5),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0), Kevin Kersnovske (2.0),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Grant Boxall¬†(2.5),¬†Patrick Ryan¬†(2.5)¬†George Hucks¬†(3.0),¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(3.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5)

Coaches РEvan Bennett (Head Coach),  Brad Dubberley  (Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Manager)

Australian Results

Pool Matches

  • Australia 49 – Belgium 37
  • Australia 52 – Sweden 38
  • Australia 35 – Canada 38
  • Australia 50 – Netherlands 27
  • Australia 55 – Germany 45
  • Australia 46 – Japan 48

5th – 6th Final

  • Australia 41 – Great Britain 42

Final Ranking – 6th

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 4th Wheelchair Rugby World Championships , Christchurch, New Zealand, 12-16 September 2006

But there was lots of support for the Australians

Things did not go smoothly for the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics but they enjoyed the support of a loud group of supporters at every game.

There weren’t so many smiles at the wheelchair rugby

Brad Dubberley (lefy) and George Hucks reflect the mood in the Australian wheelchair rugby team at the Athens summer Paralympics. After going from a bunch of ill-disciplined amateurs at the world championships in 1998 to thrilling silver medallists in 2000, the wheelchair rugby team was on a mission to go one better in Athens. The secret weapon was a 15 year-old potential superstar named Ryley Batt, who was provisionally classified as a 2.5 pointer. In wheelchair rugby, the players’ classification points range from 0.5 to 3.5 and each team can have 4 players with a total of up to 8 points on the floor at the same time. Line-ups and plays are built around combinations of players and their points ratings. However, Batt was a ‘quad amputee’, with deficiencies in all four limbs. In a sport which was traditionally played by athletes with quadriplegia, amputee athletes were a controversial inclusion, as they usually have the use of all trunk muscles. Ryley was re-classified in Athens as a 3.5 and teammate Scott Vitale was re-classified from a 1.0 to 1.5. The Australian team’s line-ups and plays were suddenly meaningless. Although the team retained key players such as Hucks and Dubberley from Sydney, it lost a close quarter-final and missed the medal round. Up until the Athens Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee’s policy had been that it was the responsibility of the sport and the individual athlete to ensure that they were classified and that their classification was up-to-date and appropriate. Partly as a result of the Athens experience, the APC introduced a national classification program in 2006 and developed a policy and practices to ensure that the APC, the sports and Australian athletes would go to the Paralympics certain of the classification of every team member.

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2014

Australian Team:

Players –¬†Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Ellery¬†(2.0),¬†Michael Ozanne¬†(0.5),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Chris Bond¬†(3.5),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Curtis Palmer¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†(2.0),¬†Jayden Warn¬†(3.0)
Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РSiobhan Crawshay (Team Manager), Elisha Gartner (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Nick Sanders (Performance Analyst), Scott Curtis (Physiotherapist)

Australian Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 55 – Great Britain 46
  • Australia 72 – Belgium 46
  • Australia 56 – Denmark 50
  • Australia 63 – Finland 43
  • Australia 68 – Canada 61

Semi-final:

  • Australia 60 – Japan 49

Gold Medal Match:

  • Australia 67 – Canada 56

Final Ranking –¬† 1st

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 6th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Odense, Denmark, 4-10 August 2014

Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 2010

Australian Team:

Players ‚Äď Nazim Erdem¬†(0.5),¬†Ryley Batt¬†(3.5),¬†Josh Hose¬†(3.0),¬†Jason Lees¬†(1.0),¬†Bryce Alman¬†(2.0),¬†Ryan Scott¬†(0.5),¬†Steve Porter¬†(2.5),¬†Cameron Carr¬†2.0,¬†Andrew Harrison¬†(2.0)

Coaches¬†–¬†Brad Dubberley¬†(Head Coach),¬†Greg Smith¬†(Assistant Coach)

Officials РKim Ellwood (Team Manager), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant), Chevvy Cooper (Mechanic), Brett Robinson (Soft Tissue Therapist)

Results:

Pool Matches

  • Australia 65 – Japan 52
  • Australia 54¬† – Poland 36
  • Australia 53 – New Zealand 43
  • Australia 67 – Belgium 41
  • Australia 69¬† – Argentina 24

Semi-final

Australia 56 – Sweden 38

Gold Medal Match

  • Australia 45 – United States 57

Final Ranking –¬† 2nd

Click here for detailed results.

Australian team and results at the 5th  Wheelchair Rugby World Championships, Vancouver, Canada, 21-26 September 2010.

Ryan Scott Takes the Ball Up

Australian wheelchair rugby player Ryan Scott with the ball during the game against New Zealand at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games.