Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.

Natalie Cordowiner continued the tradition of archers and their hats

Natalie Cordowiner was Australia’s only female Paralympic archer at the Sydney summer Paralympics. She was eliminated in the quarterfinals by four points by the eventual winner, Anita Chapman, from the UK. In 2004, Cordowiner made the final selection event for the Australian Olympic team, but was not selected. She competed at the 2004 Paralympics, again being eliminated by the eventual winner, that time in the round of 16. Cordowiner’s hat was actually part of the 2000 Australian team uniform.

Organisation and coordination was a strong feature of the Seoul Games

Spectators, wearing folded paper hats provided by a sponsor, enjoy the archery at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics.

And Eric Klein continued the tradition of distinctive hats

Eric Klein competes in an archery event at the 1984 summer Paralympics.

Susan Davies added to Australia’s medal tradition in Archery

Susan Davies on her way to a bronze medal in the women’s double FITA event at the 1984 summer Paralympics. In addition to adding to Australia’s Paralympic Archery medal tally, Davies also maintained the team tradition of distinctive, individual headwear.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

“One bad arrow can mean disaster”

You can sense the tension as Susan Davies and Eric Klein compete respectively in the women’s and men’s Double FITA Round (Paraplegic) Archery event at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Davies finished 6th, then won a bronze medal in the same event four years later at her second and final Games. Klein also finished 6th (contrary to the commentary), his best result in the four Games in which he competed, from 1980 to 1992. Archery is one of the foundation sports of the Paralympics, having been contested at every Games. It was the original “Paralympic” sport contested at the first Stoke Mandeville Games in 1948.

What is it with archers and the hats they wear?

Australian archer Eric Klein reflects between shots during the archery competition at the 1980 summer Paralympics. His lucky hat wasn’t enough to get him into the medals and Klein finished 6th of 29 competitors in the men’s double FITA round for paraplegic archers.

Before she was a shooting legend, Libby did other sports

Australian athlete Libby Kosmala in a thoughtful moment during the women’s FITA Round Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Kosmala finished 6th. The sport that she was to make her own, shooting, was introduced in Toronto, and Kosmala won her first gold medal in the new sport at those Games.

 

Even his lucky hat didn’t help Roy in ’76

Australian athlete Roy Fowler, in his distinctive hat, competes in the Open Men’s FITA Archery event at the 1976 summer Paralympics. Fowler finished well out of contention in 1976, despite medalling in archery in 1964 and 1972 and at one time being ranked in the top 20 in the world in able-bodied archery. Over his long Paralympic career, he won ten medals across three sports. Libby Richards (later Kosmala) did well in the archery but even better in the newly introduced sport of shooting, which takes place indoors and can be considerably more comfortable.