“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m – all behind Soto’s gold. The racing chairs were very unsophisticated by today’s standards, with the variety of designs showing that no-one had really yet got it right, the athletes having to work very hard to keep their chairs at speed.

A moment of truth for Brian McNicholl

Australian weightlifter Brian McNicholl makes his third and final lift attempt, supported by his coach George Dunstan, at the 1980 summer Paralympics. McNicholl won a bronze medal in the 75kg class.

Basketball was a different game in 1980 and so was the equipment

Wheelchair Basketball was a very different game in 1980, as the equipment and the athletes were still transitioning to the modern form of the sport. In this clip, the chair of an Australian player collapses and the foot plates come off when he takes a tumble – a far cry from the robust, light yet stable chairs of today. The equipment, however, didn’t stop the USA team, with its athleticism, size and experience, from giving Australia a drubbing, 87-36. The USA went on to win bronze and Australia had to wait until 1996 for its first medal finish.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

And Peter Trotter added a full set of individual medals

After his 800m race, Peter Trotter talks to Don Worley about his collection of a gold, silver and bronze medal in the individual events at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Trotter won the 5000m by 0.29s from Canada’s Rick Hansen and lost the 1500m to Hansen by 0.03s. Both athletes subsequently competed in the 1500m wheelchair demonstration event at the 1984 Olympics – the first wheelchair event at the Olympics – but finished out of the medals.

The Games opens, and Kevin Coombs gives Prince Charles a hat

Prince Charles opened the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. After declaring the Games open, he mixed with the teams of the competing nations and Australian Team captain Kevin Coombs presented him with an Akubra hat.

From the track to the dance floor – in the same chair

The competition is over and its time for the competitors at the Games to let their hair down. The numbers on the backs of the chairs on the dance floor are a bit of a giveaway that, in 1980, many athletes competed in their day chairs, with maybe different wheels. It would be hard to imagine a modern competition chair from any sport doing duty on the dance floor!

Erich Hubel takes silver behind an amazing new world record in the 800m

Five of the six finalists in the men’s Class 5 800m race at the 1980 summer Paralympics finished under the previous world record but it was Canada’s Mel Fitzgerald who led them home by smashing the previous mark by an amazing 26 seconds. Erich Hubel picked up the silver medal, 16 seconds back and still well under the old time. It was one of his three medals on the track in 1980. Robert McIntyre was less that a second behind Hubel, but out of the medals in 4th place.

But there was a silver lining for Sue Hobbs

It was the story of the Games for Australian wheelchair athlete Sue Hobbs as she pursued gold medallist Juana Soto of Mexico to win a silver medal in the women’s Class 5 1500m at the 1980 summer Paralympics. Hobbs won three silver medals at the Games – in the 60m, 800m and 1500m –