GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics

The spectatular Opening Ceremony of the 1988 summer Paralympics took place in the then Chamshil Stadium, also the athletics stadium for the Games, in front of more than 75,000 spectators. It was on a scale that was unprecedented for the Paralympics and included the ceremonial elements associated with the Olympics, such as the parade of athletes led by their nation’s flag bearer, the parade of the Paralympic flag, lighting of the cauldron, the obligatory speeches and large scale entertainment. Paul Croft was the flag bearer for the Australian Team.

GALLERY: Handwritten congratulations to the selected team

The original handwritten letter of congratulations sent by George Dunstan, the Chef de Mission of the Australian wheelchair Team to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, which also sets out the selection qualifications met by each Team member. In 1984 there was still confusion over the terminology and the use of the word “Olympic” – as in this letter – was still more common than the word “Paralympic”, although that was to change just four years later, with the Games in Seoul.

GALLERY: Now, the carnival is over

The athletes gather for the final time. The Paralympic flag comes down. The flame is extinguished. It’s time to party to mark the end of a six week festival of sport in Sydney – the Olympics and Paralympics. Fireworks. And, as the lights go out, The Seekers sing “The Carnival is Over”.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

GALLERY: The opening ceremony celebrated Australia and its culture.

Flag bearer Brendan Burkett and Chef de Mission Paul Bird led the Australian team into the stadium, cheered on by a crowd of 110,000 and a TV audience in the millions. The cauldron was lit by Louise Sauvage, after the torch was carried on its final leg around the stadium by athletes representing each Paralympic impairment category – winter great Michael Milton, first Indigenous Paralympian Kevin Coombs, and three who would compete in Sydney – Katrina Webb, Lisa Llorens and Anthony Clarke. Vision impaired swimmer Tracey Cross read the athletes’ oath, before the Games were opened by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir William Deane. 6,000 volunteers participated in the ceremony, including thousands of children, many repainting panels on the ground to create a changing tableau. Then followed a concert, featuring Australian artists such as Kylie Minogue and Yothu Yindi. It was an emotional and upbeat ceremony of celebration, created by Karen Richards.

GALLERY: Scenes from the successful women’s basketball campaign

The Australian women’s basketball team, known as The Pearls, won Australia’s first ever medal in Olympic or Paralympic basketball at the 1992 “Paralympic Games for Persons with Mental Handicap“. Donna Burns was the star of the team, averaging 25 points a game. The team members were: Lorraine Archer, Tanya Atcheson, Donna Burns, Gladys Delaney, Melissa Gallacher, Fiona Hinds, Annette Kelly, Tina Kenna, Christine Humphries, Alice Toogood, with Coach Margaret Sheriff and Manager Robyn Smith.

GALLERY: Dramatic finish of the TS1 100m with Mark Whiteman and Kerrod McGregor

The men’s 100m sprint event for men’s TS1 classification – leg amputees – at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics was hotly contested. Australians Kerrod McGregor (far left) and Mark Whiteman (second from left) finished out of the medals, while Switzerland’s Lukas Christen launched himself at the line to take silver and a spectacular tumble. Christen is wearing new technology – a carbon fibre ‘blade’ leg, while most other runners are wearing older technology, ending in prosthetic feet inserted into standard running shoes.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

GALLERY: But the rock stars of the Australian team were the ‘Awesome Foursome’

The Australian men’s 4x100m amputee relay team of Nigel Parsons, Rodney Nugent, Adrian Lowe and Jason Smart went to the 1988 Seoul Paralympics with an attitude and an ambition to win gold. They had jackets specially made to promote their prowess and they didn’t disappoint, winning the gold medal by 7/100ths of a second ahead of China. With the substitution of Andrew O’Sullivan for Jason Smart, the team also won the 4x400m relay.

GALLERY: Opening ceremony of the Seoul Paralympics