Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.

The roads of Athens could be a place for a ride …

After a dominant performance on the track at the Athens summer Paralympics, the Australian cycling team backed up with some more great rides in the road cycling. Unlike able-bodied competition, most of the riders on the road were not specialists but were backing up from the endurance events on the track. Kieran Modra, however, was in everything, from the sprint to the road race. Barely recovered from the horrific crash in the tandem sprint, Modra paired with Robert Crowe in the combined road race/time trial event. Crowe and Modra lost skin and time when they skidded and crashed on the third lap of the road race, leaving them in 8th place. However, they rode a brilliant time trial to overhaul all but two riders and come away with a bronze medal. Overall, Australia won 24 cycling medals (the next nearest was 9) and 10 gold medals (the next nearest was 3). After the Games, cycling head coach Kevin McIntosh was named Australian Paralympic Committee’s Coach of the Year.

Athens in 2004 – great venues, wide open spaces and big crowds

Under the bright, Greek sky, crowds enjoy the main hub of the Athens summer Paralympics at OAKA, the Olympic/Paralympic park which contained the athletics, cycling, swimming, basketball and tennis venues. Athenians stayed away from the Olympics but many came to see the Paralympics and experience the venues in a less expensive, more relaxed setting. The organisers continued the concept of the ‘day pass’ that was so successful at the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, allowing spectators to enjoy a variety of sports on the one ticket.

The Rollers were back on the dais

After winning in 1996 and a disappointing 5th in Sydney in 2000, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team, the Rollers, played for gold again at the Athens summer Paralympics. After a bad loss to Canada in the first game of the tournament, the Rollers cruised through every game into the final against – Canada again. With Murray Treseder now at the coaching helm, the Rollers were disciplined and organised but couldn’t find the answer to the experience and athleticism of Canada’s stars Joey Johnson and Patrick Anderson. The Rollers left Athens without another gold medal but with a young, rejuvenated team, with its sights set on Beijing.

The Aussie fans were out in force

The Australian fans had plenty to cheer about at the wheelchair basketball, with both the men’s team – the Rollers – and the women’s team – the Gliders – in the gold medal games at the Athens summer Paralympics.

Then it was all over and time to pick up some souvenirs

Two Australian team members, who bear some resemblance to a vision impaired cyclist and a massage therapist, do what visitors to Greece have traditionally done for millennia – collect souvenirs. At the end of any Games, the woven fencing banners become trash, so some enterprising members of the Australian team took it on themselves to help the organisers dismantle the Games signage. Another team member doing the same was not as lucky as these two, spending time in the Village police station before being rescued by the team’s Chef de Mission and let off with a warning.

Congratulations from the Chef de Mission on a job well done

The daily Australian team newsletter, ‘Banjo’s Bugle’, enabled the team to share the highs and lows of the Athens summer Paralympics. On the final day of the Games, Paul Bird, the Australian team Chef de Mission, reflected on the achievements of the team and acknowledged the role played by all members. You can read Bird’s words in this extract from Banjo’s Bugle. That night, the closing ceremony was a very modest affair. There had been rumours that the organising committee had literally run out of money for the event. In the end, the deaths of 7 schoolchildren in a bus crash on the way to Athens for the ceremony was the reason that the ceremony was curtailed and the Athens games ended without the now traditional fanfare.

Or a place for one of the great performances of the Games

Exhaustion is written in the face and body of Kurt Fearnley as he crosses the line to win the T54 wheelchair marathon at the Athens summer Paralympics. Fearnley left the pack on a climb with about 7km to go and then pushed the last 5km with one tyre punctured. Although the tyre retained some pressure, it made the chair unbalanced and the pushing effort so much greater. It was the race that established Fearnley as the pre-eminent wheelchair distance racer. Some time after Fearnley had recovered and left the scene, the ambulant athletes entered the stadium, including vision-impaired runner Roy Daniell, who improved on his bronze medal in Sydney in 2000 with a gutsy silver medal. The marathon started in the village of Marathon and ended in the historic, marble Panathenaic Stadium, originally built in 331BC and the main venue for the first modern Olympic Games, in 1896.

A place for a lie down …

Athletics staff member Louise Mogg feigns exhaustion on the road outside the Panathenaic Stadium after completing the entire marathon course (in a car) just ahead of the field. It was an incident that typified the nature of the Athens summer Paralympics. Australia’s marathon competitors and some staff stayed in a hotel in the village of Marathon the night before the race to avoid the long drive down early in the morning. After ferrying the competitors to the start and seeing them through the marshalling area, Mogg, coach Andrew Dawes, massage therapist Kieran Cusack and HQ staff member Tony Naar set off for the drive in their official team car to the finish line in Athens. Less than 400m from the start, they turned onto the actual course where there was a gap in the fencing and drove the closed road the entire 42km into the centre of Athens on the marathon route, past hundreds of officials and police. They were not challenged as Dawes talked his teammates through the course and the critical points for the racers. On arrival at the marble stadium where the race would finish, they moved a barrier aside, parked the car behind it, and walked across the road to await the real racers. But not before Mogg, Cusack (left) and Dawes posed for a photo.

A place for a chat …

Australian cyclist Peter Brooks talks to John Baldock from the broadcaster SBS after the road race stage of his combined road race and time trial event at the Athens summer Paralympics. Brooks finished 4th in the road race and would need a big time trial ride to win a medal. Brooks, a good time trialler, came through to win the bronze medal. As the number of medal events was limited by the International Paralympic Committee, cycling chose to combine the road race and the time trial for most classes into a single medal event, which was decided on the average of the two events. The Athens Games were the only Games between 1988 and 2014 not covered for Australia by the ABC.