Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.

The heat was relentless but so were the Aussies

Athletes with quadriplegia have difficulty controlling their body temperature and hot and humid conditions can massively affect performance if the athlete and their team are not careful. Fabian Blattman went for bare feet and a shade towel as he waited for his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. It worked for Blattman, who won gold in the T50 1500m and silver in the 800m.

Louise Sauvage was recognised as Paralympian of the Year

The Australian Paralympian of the Year Awards was introduced by the then Australian Paralympic Federation in 1994 to recognise the outstanding achievements of Australia’s Paralympic athletes. Louise Sauvage won the first awards and was the popular choice again in 1996 after her performance at the Atlanta Paralympic Games, where she won 4 gold medals and every event in her class from 400m to 5000m.

The team was welcomed home with parades around Australia

The South Australian members of the 1996 Australian Paralympic Team were welcomed home from the Games with a parade and mayoral reception in Adelaide city.

Then it was time to party

Australian teammates Don Elgin and Mick Dowling were in a festive mood at the conclusion of the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. Although conditions at the Games had been at times been challenging – weather, transport, accommodation, food and the dismantling of Olympic infrastructure – the Games were a great success for the Australian team and there was a spirit of optimism in the air about what could be achieved in four years time in Sydney.

The flag was passed to Sydney

Michael Knight, New South Wales Minister for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, was handed the IPC flag at the closing ceremony of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games, symbolising the transfer of the Games from one host city to the next.

The ABC had been there to capture it all

By 1996, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) was firmly committed to covering the Paralympic Games. Presenter and journalist Karen Tighe (seated, in black), became the face and voice of the ABC’s Paralympic coverage, attending every Games from 1992 to 2012, with the exception of 2004, when SBS broadcast the Games in Australia.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

And running legs were still a work in progress

Australian athlete Neil Fuller on his way to a silver medal in the T44 200m event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. At his second Games, Fuller won silver in each of the sprints (100m and 200m) and his second of 3 consecutive gold medals in the 4X100m relay. Fuller’s ‘blade’ running leg was on the way to its current form, even if the strapping to hold it in place was possibly not the most elegant. By the time he hung up his running shoe and blade after the 2004 Games, Fuller had won 15 Paralympic medals, 6 of them gold.

Racing wheelchair design had taken a big leap by Atlanta

Australian T53 wheelchair athlete Paul Wiggins (centre, number 4 on helmet) competes on the track at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. By 1996, racing chairs had largely developed the design seen today – longer, with a large single front wheel, small push rims, custom made bucket seat with legs tucked under and carbon fibre wheels were starting to appear.