GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

GALLERY: “The flame that lit the world … is now slowly burning out.”

Scenes from the Closing Ceremony of the 1988 Seoul Paralympic Games.

The final Games for Don Worley, capturing images and film from 1972

The personal identity card of Don Worley for the 1988 summer Paralympics which accredited him as a photographer at the Games. Worley had attended the four previous Games as a member of the Australian team. Ostensibly an ‘escort’ to assist athletes, his primary duties at those Games were in fact as a videographer. In 1988 the ABC sent a crew to film the Games and Worley turned to his other love – still photography. Through Worley’s work, footage and images exist of Australia at the Paralympic Games from 1972 to 1988 that would otherwise have never been captured. In 2015 Worley donated his films to the National Film and Sound Archives. Still and clips from Worley’s films are used throughout this history.

Chris Nunn talks about the changes that needed to be made to be more successful

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

The 1988 Australian team symbol was a play on the official Games mascots

This cloth patch shows the twin koalas used as a symbol by the Australian Team. The bears are a play on the official Games mascots. One Koala represents winter athletes and one represents summer athletes, with the idea that both teams were united in the same Paralympic year. The Gomdoori, whose name is derived from the Korean word for “teddy bear”, were the Paralympic mascots for the Seoul 1988 Paralympics. While bears are commonly associated with wisdom and courage, the pair is depicted with their legs tied together, symbolising the ability to overcome adversity through co-operation and to encourage mankind to work together peacefully and harmoniously. (Source – International Paralympic Committee.)

Carmel Williams was Australia’s only female table tennis player in a team of nine

Australian table tennis player Carmel Williams serves during a match at the 1988 Seoul Summer Paralympics. The 1988 Games marked the beginning of a drought of table tennis medals for the Australian Paralympic Team, with its next podium finish not coming for another 28 years, in Rio 2016.

Another Games, another javelin medal for Donna Smith

Australian thrower Donna Smith poses with the other two placegetters in women’s javelin A6A8A9L6 event at the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. The gold medalist (centre) was Britta Jaenicke and the bronze medalist was Jessica Sachse, both from Germany. Smith competed at four Games, three in athletics where she medalled at each, before finishing her career as a wheelchair basketballer in 1996.

The drama of performing in the big arena

Edward Roos competes in the discus at the Seoul summer Paralympics. Roos finished fifth in the discus and was also unplaced in the shot put.

Rodney Nugent on his way to one of his seven medals in Seoul

Australian athlete Rodney Nugent keeps a close eye on the bar as he jumps to a bronze medal at the 1988 summer Paralympics. Nugent won four gold medals and three bronze in Seoul, finishing the Games as Australia’s most successful competitor.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.