Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.

Welcome home for Caspers and Kosmala

Shooting gold medallists Libby Kosmala (left) and Barbara Caspers (right) enjoy the cheers of the crowds at a welcome home celebration for the 1984 Australian Paralympic Team in Adelaide. Kosmala and Caspers each won four gold medals, Australia’s best ever shooting performance.

Jan Randles was Australia’s first female marathon gold medallist

Jan Randles examines her raw hands after winning the women’s class 4 wheelchair marathon at the 1984 summer Paralympics. It was the first Paralympic Games marathon and the event was still seen as a major challenge for athletes, especially women. Alan Dufty also won gold for Australia in the men’s class 1C.

“Marathon runners, on your marks…” for the first Paralympic marathon

Now one of the premier events in wheelchair sport, the wheelchair marathon was contested for the first time in the Paralympics at the 7th Games, in 1984 summer Games in Stoke Mandeville, after much lobbying by athletes. Nowadays, the wheelchair marathon is one of the blue ribbon events on the Games’ program but for many years it was considered potentially dangerous for the health of athletes with spinal injuries to compete in such a gruelling event. In 1984, men and women from all classes started at the same time and raced their way back to Stoke Mandeville. Australia picked up two gold medals in that first marathon – won by Alan Dufty in the men’s class 1C and Jan Randles in the women’s class 4.

Wayne Ryding was one of just two Aussie gold medalists in the Stoke Mandeville pool

Swimmer Wayne Ryding looks pleased after winning gold in the men’s class 5 100m freestyle at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. Ryding was one of only two Australian swimmers to win gold in Stoke Mandeville. After the 1984 Games, Ryding – who was born in England – married an Englishwoman and subsequently competed for Great Britain at the 1996 and 2000 Paralympics.

And Barbara Caspers chimed in with four shooting golds of her own

Shooter Barbara Caspers (centre) receives one of the four gold medals she won at the 1984 Summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, this one in the mixed air rifle event. Caspers and her teammate Libby Kosmala dominated the mixed and women’s air rifle events at the Games, winning 8 of the 9 gold medals on offer. Allan Chadwick picked up Australia’s 9th shooting gold, ensuring a finish as the top shooting nation at the Games, with 9 straight gold medals.

Libby Kosmala lets nothing distract her from dominating her sport

The cap of Australian shooter Libby Kosmala has an adjustable side flap on the brim, to block out any distraction, and she wears a heavy shooting jacket to help steady her body and arms. Kosmala was at her peak at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville, winning four gold medals, all with world record scores.

Reclassification of several players affected the basketball team’s line-ups

The Australian wheelchair basketball team enjoyed a better preparation than at previous Games, with a camp at the Australian Institute of Sport and games in the USA on the way to the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville. However, several players were reclassified at the Games, changing the point combinations available to coach Bruno Moretti and – combined with a comparative lack of high level experience – making it difficult for the team to be competitive with the best in the world, including the British. Great Britain won this game. Australia finished 11th of the 18 participating teams.

Tip-off, as Australia takes on Great Britain in basketball

Tip-off in the wheelchair basketball game between Australia and Great Britain at the 1984 summer Paralympics. Great Britain won the game. The Australian team contained two players from the team at the first Paralympics in 1960 – Kevin Coombs and player/coach Bruno Moretti – and a player who would captain the team at the in 2000 Games in Sydney – David Gould, thus spanning 40 years of wheelchair basketball history. However, Australia finished back in the field in 1984, 11th of 18 teams.

Always good to have your teammates behind you, especially in javelin

Watched closely by her teammates, Julie Dowling is on her way to a gold medal in the class 4 women’s javelin event at the 1984 summer Paralympics in Stoke Mandeville.