Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.

But Australia came to compete

A Swimming medal ceremony for the Class C crawl at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. All three medalists were Australian – L to R: Bill Mather-Brown (silver), Alan Yeomans (gold), Gary Hooper (bronze). Yeomans was a jockey who acquired paraplegia from a horse racing accident. He later became the first horse trainer in Australia with paraplegia.

A friendly Games

Australian and New Zealand athletes chat while they watch teammates compete at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Perth put on superb weather and the Games were friendly and relaxed.

It all started in the rehab hospitals

At the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, this banner on the back of a wheelchair belonging to one of the two Northern Ireland athletes clearly shows where they were from. In the early years of the Paralympic movement, rehabilitation centres continued to play a core role in the promotion and development of Para-sport, starting with Stoke Mandeville and spreading globally.

The official program

The official program of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games cost two shillings, or twenty cents.

Trophy for the most successful team

Australian Team members with the trophy for the most successful team at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. L to R: Vic Wheelchair Sports President, Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton), Margaret Ross, Lorraine Dodd (Later McCoulough).

Aiming for another medal

Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) competes in the Archery competition at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney won 8 gold medals at the Games across a range of sports.

Rocking their Australian caps

When not competing, Australian athletes supported teammates. Here at the Royal Showground in Claremont, the main venue for the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games, Unidentified male (left), Lorraine Dodd (centre) and Margaret Ross enjoy the competition.

Season ticket – official pass

The official pass for competitors at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games was a stamped season ticket, giving them access to all venues and events. Nowadays, in less simple times, competitors at such major events have photo ID accreditation cards which may also serve as their visa for the country hosting the Games.

Swimmers wait for their chance

Australian Daphne Ceeney (later Hilton) left, with English swimmer Sue Masham (later Cunliffe-Lister) and Australian Gary Hooper watch events poolside at the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games. Ceeney was the most successful competitor – she won 8 gold medals at the Games. Masham was injured in a riding accident, won Paralympic medals in Table Tennis at three Games, sits in the House of Lords and is a champion for disability related causes.