The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic hockey venue at Sydney Olympic Park provided a perfect surface for the 7-a-side football competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Australia went down in a thriller to Spain by 0-1. The Australian team, known as the ‘Drillers’ in Sydney (now called the ‘Pararoos’), lost all three of its pool games and didn’t advance to the semi-finals in the competition.

GALLERY: Sydney’s venues were spectacular and often full

Since 1988 the Paralympics had taken place in the same venues as the Olympics that preceded them. In Sydney, almost all the venues were custom built for the Games and were the best to date. And they were often filled, thanks to an innovative ticket policy that gave spectators a day pass to all venues for just $15. Few who experienced the Games would ever forget the queues outside venues and the atmosphere inside. One of the noisiest was The Dome, where the finals of the wheelchair rugby saw crowds of 10,000, many stamping their feet on the temporary grandstands, as Australia won the semi-final by one point and lost the gold medal game by the same margin.

Meanwhile, at the open air velodrome, it was brutally hot

There was little relief available from the hot, Atlanta summer sun at the open air velodrome.

The dining tent is a fuel stop and a social hub

The dining hall in the Paralympic Village at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games. Games’ dining halls are generally large, temporary constructions which can seat large numbers of people for meals and socialising. While Team staff tend to be very busy, many athletes have large amounts of down time and the dining hall is a popular place to spend time.

The sailing was conducted in another, spectacular, purpose built venue

Australia’s sailor in the 2.4mR class, Peter Thompson, waits to be lifted aboard while coach Lachlan Gilbert organises the equipment before a race at the Athens summer Paralympics. Thompson, who had won the world championships in 1999, finished 5th in Athens after his fourth place finish at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The sailing took place from a brand new venue at Helliniko in the south of Athens. Like many of the 2004 venues, not only was it state-of-the-art but it was also huge. The venue was so far from the Paralympic Village, at the opposite end of Athens, that the sailing team stayed in a nearby hotel for the duration of the regatta.

The shooting venue was state-of-the-art

Set on a hill above an olive grove, outside Athens, the shooting venue was one of many that were constructed especially for the Athens summer Paralympics and Olympics. To those at the Games, however, it was obvious that Greece had extended itself as far as possible to build the infrastructure for the Games, with little money remaining for niceties such as landscaping or post-Games maintenance.

Libby Kosmala on how the athletes’ Village made Sydney special

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Libby Kosmala
Recorded: 8 April 2011
Location: Klemzig, S.A.
Listen to the full interview here.

There was a big effort to make the facilities ‘disability friendly’

A spectator with an assistance dog enjoys the wheelchair tennis competition at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. The Games’ organisers made a large effort to make the Games venues accessible for spectators as well as athletes.

The perfect backdrop for Australia’s first sailing gold medal

With the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background, the Australian Sonar class sailing team of Noel Robins (skipper), Jamie Dunross and Graeme Martin compete in the sailing on Sydney Harbour during the Sydney summer Paralympics. The Australian team won the gold medal in the Sonar class, the first time sailing was a medal sport at the Games. Skipper Noel Robins had vast experience as a sailor, including the America’s Cup and the Admiral’s Cup. He was the oldest Australian to ever win a gold medal at the Paralympics.

A magnificent venue for a thrilling football contest

The synthetic h