Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.

Bill Mather-Brown reflects on the great contributions of Frank Ponta

Interviewer: Robin Poke
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Bill Mather-Brown
Recorded: 3 June 2010
Location: Perth, WA
Listen to the full interview here.

And for ‘Milto’, just being there was a huge achievement

After he retired from competitive skiing in 2006, Michael Milton took up competitive cycling, a sport he had used to maintain fitness for skiing. Just over a year before the Beijing summer Paralympics, Milton was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. Milton underwent surgery to remove the tumour and, as he recovered from the operation, got back on his bike with the goal of making the Beijing Games. Remarkably, he qualified and was selected in the Australian team, becoming one of a select group to compete at both the summer and winter Paralympics. Although still below peak fitness, Milton finished 9th of 20 riders in the LC3-4 1km time trial on the first day of competition in Beijing.

Chris Scott was also in a familiar position – on the top of the podium

An emotional Chris Scott salutes the crowd after receiving his sixth Paralympic gold medal for the CP4 men’s individual pursuit at the Beijing summer Paralympics. Scott’s Paralympic career spanned six Games, from 1988 to 2008. In his final Games he collected a ‘full set’ of medals – one gold, one silver and one bronze.

Kieran Modra in a familiar position – winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games

Kieran Modra (vision impaired rider, back) and his sighted pilot Tyson Lawrence acknowledge the crowd after their gold medal ride in the men’s tandem pursuit at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in a new world record, beating the previous record they set in the morning’s heats. Modra won the same event with Robert Crowe at the 2004 Paralympics, both times winning Australia’s first gold medal of the Games. Modra would go on to win the event for a third consecutive time in London in 2012, partnered by Scott McPhee.

The TV ad was the final element of the UNBELIEVABLE campaign

In the lead-up to the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games, Publicis Mojo, the advertising agency for Australian Paralympic sponsor Toyota, donated its services to create a campaign to promote Paralympic sport and assist the fundraising efforts of the then Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). The campaign was based around the tagline ‘UNBELIEVABLE’. Three radio ‘community service advertisements’ (CSAs) were released in September 2007, followed by three print ads in July 2008. In July 2008, as the Games approached this TV ad, featuring Matthew Cowdrey, was distributed. As with the radio and print ads, the APC had no money to buy space, so it relied on the goodwill and support of media outlets and the influence of Toyota and Publicis Mojo. Fortunately, the TV ad was played widely and seen by millions of Australians.

Time to hand over to the next generation (of one legged skiers)

Michael Milton, who had won his last medal, was selected to carry the Australian flag for the closing ceremony of the Torino winter Paralympics. However, Milton asked that Toby Kane, who had won his first medal in Torino, carry the flag. It was a symbolic handing over to the new generation of skiers. Like Milton, Kane is a one legged skier.

Michael Milton went retro in his final race at the winter Paralympics

Bringing the curtain down on a long and successful career, in his last ever race that the winter Paralympics, Michael Milton wore the Australian team race suit from the 1994 winter Paralympics, when he won a gold, a silver and two bronze medals and became the first Australian to win a medal in every alpine skiing event at the same Games. The Torino winter Paralympics had been a tough competition for Milton but he had achieved his goal of winning a medal and was ready to move on with his life.

Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian

Thirty years after the first winter Paralympics, Emily Jansen became Australia’s first female winter Paralympian at the Torino winter Paralympics. Jansen competed in the technical events – the giant slalom and the slalom.

Michael Milton’s 11th winter Paralympic medal

Michael Milton took out silver in the men’s standing downhill event from a field of 49 skiers in the alpine skiing at the Torino winter Paralympics. Changes to the competition structure for the Torino Games meant that all standing skiers competed for one gold medal, with a factoring system, based on historical performances, used to standardise times and determine the winners. After sweeping the four alpine skiing events in his class at the 2002 winter Paralympics, Milton knew that to reach the podium in any event in Torino would be a huge achievement. While most alpine skiers have a preference either for speed events (the downhill or the super-G) or for technical events (slalom and giant slalom), Milton’s 11 career Paralympic medals were evenly split among each of the four events that made up the alpine skiing program, highlighting his versatility.