Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.

Veteran Terry Giddy just missed a medal in discus

Terry Giddy competes in the F55 seated discus throw event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games in which he finished fourth. He won a bronze medal in the shot put. Giddy started his Paralympic throws career in 1972, when athletes threw out of wheelchairs which were strapped to rings bolted to the throwing circle. By 1996, athletes were using custom built throwing frames which were designed to fit the athlete and provide maximum stability once they were tied down. This innovation made a significant difference to throwing performances for seated athletes and Australia led the world in the development of the technology.

Smooth as a Sunday sail

Skipper Noel Robins (left) holds the tiller and chats with teammates Graeme Martin (centre) and Jamie Dunross as they compete in the Sonar class in the sailing competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics. Benefitting from Robins’ vast experience, the team won Australia’s first sailing gold medal. Dunross, who has quadriplegia, sits in a pivoting seat which can move from side to side across the boat so that he stays on the windward side as he controls the ropes (“sheets”) at the front of the boat.

In Boccia, millimetres matter

Officials measuring the distances of competitors’ balls from the jack during the Boccia competition at the Sydney summer Paralympics.

Shot put was one of Don’s six events – in addition to the pentathlon

Don Elgin was gregarious, loud and brash. And exceptionally dedicated and hard working. At the Sydney summer Paralympics, he won bronze in one of the toughest events, the pentathlon. He also competed in almost every other athletics event available in his class, from the 100m through to throws events, possibly one of the most daunting schedules of any athlete at the Games. For the throws events, like other Australia leg amputees, used a special prosthesis with a short foot that facilitated balance and rotational movement across the throwing circle. The 2000 Games showed significant technical equipment innovations across a full range of sports.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Keith Bremner shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Keith Bremner lines up the target during a pistol event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Bremner represented Australia at four consecutive Paralympics, from 1984 to 1996. After competing in pistol events in 1984, he changed to air rifle for the 1988 Games, then competed in pistol again in 1992 and 1996.

James Nomarhas rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Pistol shooter James Nomarhas rests between shots during his event at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. Nomarhas won silver in the Mixed Sport Pistol SH1 event.

Ashley Adams rests between shots, Atlanta 1996

Shooter Ashley Adams rests between shots during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. In 2004 at the Athens Paralympics, Adams won silver in the 50m prone rifle event with a score of 697.8. That score would have seen him finish sixth in the same event at the 2004 Olympics, ten places ahead of Australia’s top Olympic shooter at those Games. Adams was never considered for Olympic selection, even though his event was identical.

The lawn bowls chairs were built for the sport

Australian lawn bowler Robert Tinker plays a shot during the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics in a chair with a seat height to optimise his technique, larger, softer tyres than a day chair and an extended footrest for balance.