For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.

Be prepared – bring a spare leg

Australian high jumper Michael Hackett leans on his competition leg as he watches events in progress with athletics coach Vic Renalson at the athletics during the 1988 Seoul summer Paralympics. Hackett won silver in the A4A9 high jump.

But Australia again sent a team separated into disability sub-teams, as Chris Nunn explains

Interviewer: Mick Fogarty
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Interviewee: Chris Nunn
Recorded: 15 June 2011
Location: Canberra, ACT
Listen to the full interview here.

A special courage – jumping blind

Jeff McNeil is an Australian athlete with a vision impairment. He competed in the high jump at the 1980 summer Paralympics, finishing 15th of 24 competitors. Without being able to see the bar, athletes with a vision impairment need to carefully measure the approach and just the timing of the jump, as well as the position of the landing mat. McNeil competed in a wide range of track events from 100m to the marathon, as well as jumping events.

GALLERY: Quadriplegia requires unique solutions for archer Trewhella

Australian archer Ian Trewhella competed in the men’s short metric round event for athletes with tetraplegia at the 1980 summer Paralympics winning a silver medal. An athlete with quadriplegia (tetraplegia) has limited sensation and muscle engagement in the arms as well as the legs, so Trewhella used a variety of aids and strategies to hold the bow and arrow. Trewhella is using a recurve bow, which requires considerable strength to pull. Nowadays, archers with tetraplegia shoot with compound bows, which require less effort and thus enable archers to be more accurate.

Don Perriman tells of the teams within the team

Interviewer: Nikki Henningham
Interviewee: Don Perriman
Publisher: National Library of Australia
Recorded: 21 February 2012
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Listen to the full interview here.

For Gerrard Gosens, athletics is a team sport

In athletics, blind runners are physically connected to their sighted guide for all races, from sprints to the marathon. Not only must the athlete and their guide be matched in terms of performance, they also have to be able to get along. It means that individual events become events for a two person team. Gerrard Gosens and his guide runner, Bill Hunter, competed in the T11 5000m, 10000m and marathon at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics – a gruelling schedule. Gosens finished 6th in each of the two track events and 8th in the marathon. Off the track, Gosens was the executive officer of the Queensland Paralympic Committee. He later went on to compete with some success in the TV show ‘Dancing with the Stars’.

Having professional coaches was a big advantage for Australia

Australian athletics coaches Brett Jones (left) and Chris Nunn congratulate athletes Lisa Llorens (left, bronze medallist) and Sharon Rackham (gold medallist) after the T20 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. The open inclusion of highly qualified coaches in the Australian team, as had long been the case in able bodied sport, was a significant innovation by the Australian Paralympic Federation and paid massive dividends in terms of team performance. Even in 1992, coaches on the team had been appointed as ‘escorts’.

Peter Worsley shoots, Atlanta Paralympics

Peter Worsley aims his rifle during competition at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics. As an athlete with quadriplegia, Worsley cannot not hold the weight of the rifle to shoot, so has a flexible stand, which bears the weight of the rifle, but requires him to fully control the aim.

Katrina Webb had a great story and a great Games

Katrina Webb was a netballer at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and had recurring injury problems due to weakness in one leg. Her parents had not told her that she had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a young child. When she was diagnosed again at the AIS, athletics coach Chris Nunn suggested that she try Para-athletics. Less than two years later, at the Atlanta 1996 Paralympic Games, she won two gold and one silver medal. Webb attracted criticism because she didn’t appear ‘disabled enough’. She achieved more success at the 2000 Sydney Games and has gone on to be an advocate and representative for disability in Australia and internationally.